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2019 Sustainability & Multimodal Planning Workshop - Program

This page is a preliminary overview of the conference schedule and subject to change.

 

Sunday, July 28

A Multimodal Tour

10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Prior to the start of the APTA Sustainability & Multimodal Planning Workshop, maximize your training and travel dollars by joining us first for a Multimodal Tour in Boston. This tour will be conducted by MBTA staff and will take you across over eight modes - BRT, commuter rail, intercity rail, light rail, heavy rail, bus, trackless trolley, and ferry - in MBTA's system. This tour is at capacity and will no longer being accepting registrants. If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please email APTA's Elizabeth Lovinggood at elovinggood@apta.com.

Sustainability & Transit-Oriented Development Tour

1 - 4:30p.m.

This tour will feature the sustainability elements and transit-oriented developments in MBTA's system. Participation will be limited to 35 and advance registration is required. Email APTA's Elizabeth Lovinggood at elovinggood@apta.com to register.
The MBTA has made environmental sustainability and climate resiliency one of the focal points of its capital program and the sustainability tour will highlight a few of those projects.   The tour will include a stop at the new Boston Landing Station, which was developed in conjunction with a major TOD project and is one of only two ENVISION certified transit projects in the US.   The tour will also see the Green Line Extension (which will also be ENVISION certified) currently in construction.  The tour will highlight the challenges of bringing a new high capacity transit line into one of the most densely developed areas of the country.   The tour will also highlight the Green Line portal protection project, which is a $40 million project designed to protect the Green Line central tunnel system from flooding.   The tour will also include a visit to Greentown Labs, the largest clean technology incubator in the United States.  Greentown Labs has been the starting place for over 120 companies whose technologies span across many sectors of the energy space, from energy efficiency and transportation to renewable power generation and water technology.  

Note:  All tours will involve a significant amount of walking and accessing transit vehicles. While not all MBTA vehicles and stations are fully accessible, the ones on the tours will are accessible. Where appropriate, the MBTA will provide Personal Protection Equipment (hard hats, safety vests, protective eyewear, etc.). Participants should be sure to wear footwear appropriate for a maintenance facility or construction site. 

Registration

2 - 5p.m.

Lanyards sponsored by GIRO Inc.

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Conference giveaway sponsored by Greystone Management Solutions
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Tabletop Displays

3 - 5p.m.
 

Monday, July 29

Networking Breakfast

7 - 8a.m.

Breakfast sponsored by BSC Group, Inc.

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Registration

7a.m. - 5p.m.

Tabletop Displays

7a.m. - 7:30p.m.

Welcome and Opening Remarks

8 - 8:15a.m.

MBTA and Partners Host Forum

8:15 - 9:30a.m.

MBTA faces a series of challenges and opportunities as it works to address the 21st century transit needs in an area that hosts the oldest transit system in the Americas. Leadership from the MBTA will be discussing their recent accomplishments as well as plans that are underway that are designed to maximize mobility, improve efficiency, build resiliency and integrate technology and emerging transportation options into its core system  At the Workshop, attendees will hear from MBTA and its partners about how it is addressing the ever increasing and changing demands on transit as well as how it is rethinking the network to integrate technology so as to provide a transit network that continues to meet the needs of its customers and the communities it serves.

Session sponsored by Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc.

Panelists
  • Steven Poftak, General Manager, Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, Boston, MA
  • Stephanie Pollack, Secretary, Massachusetts Department of Transportation, Boston, MA
  • Chris Osgood, Chief of the Streets, Transportation, and Sanitation, Office of the Mayor, Boston, MA

Equity and Low-Income Fares

9:45 - 11:15 a.m.
Moderator
  • Sally Goodman, Co-Chair, Environmental Justice/Title VI Subcommittee; Title VI Program Administrator, AC Transit (Alameda Contra-Costa Transit District), Oakland, CA
Panelists
  • Diana Hammons, Senior Manager, Revenue Collection & Sales, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, San Francisco, CA
  • Chris Arkills, Government Relations Officer, King County Metro , Seattle, WA

EV and Vehicle to Grid Technologies: What's Ahead for Our Fleets and Infrastructure?

9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

Transit agencies and regulators are studying the rapidly evolving world of automated vehicles and vehicle electrification and what this will mean for fleets and infrastructure. Considering the parking lots and decks, maintenance facilities, and depots that are a part of transit agencies, the infrastructure necessary for electric charging (for both customer and transit vehicles) and the technology for vehicle-to-grid power sharing and distributed generation are among the myriad of considerations that will need to be incorporated into long-term asset management and operations plans.This panel will explore EV and vehicle-to-grid technologies and the leading role transit agencies can play. It will examine the role of regulatory agencies, public utility commissions, and the private sector in electrifying the transportation network. Grid capacity, costs, parking spot locations, evolving technologies, ride-sharing, commuter and para-transit, environmental benefits, and other topics will be discussed.

Panelists

  • Adam Zellner, Member of the Board of Trustees, New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition (NJCCC), new Brunswick, NJ
  • Richard Mroz, Managing Director, Resolute Strategies, Haddonfield, NJ

Making the Most of a Moment

9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

Sometimes an unplanned event allows us to try out new ideas and think “outside the box.” Situations such as losing a main highway or arterial into downtown, special events and the unexpected closure of a key facility or part of infrastructure can be an opportunity to be creative and take a chance. Sometimes projects that we dread the most can result in new opportunities and ways of doing business. Hear how your peers have planned effectively, coordinated with others under extenuating circumstances and have been flexible to weather the disruption and come out stronger in the end.

Moderator
  • Peter G. Cafiero, Acting Director, Special Policy Development and Planning (MTA), MTA New York City Transit, New York, NY
Leveraging Interagency Cooperation to Reduce Transit Impacts during Special Events, Filming and Cons
  • Jonathan Kibrick, Transportation Planner and Film Coordinator, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (Muni), San Francisco, CA
Lessons Learned with the Opening (and Abrupt Closure) of a Multi-Agency Transit Hub
  • Linda Morris, Senior Transportation Planner, AC Transit (Alameda Contra-Costa Transit District), Oakland, CA
“Juicing the ‘Seattle Squeeze’: Lessons Learned from Seattle’s SR-99 Closure”
  • Benjamin Smith, Senior Transportation Planner, City of Seattle Department of Transportation, Seattle, WA
Disrupting Delays: How to Survive and Thrive in Major Freeway Construction Using Transit
  • Benjamin Surma, Data Management Analyst, Metro Transit, Minneapolis, MN

Speaker Luncheon

11:30a.m. - 1p.m.

Lunch sponsored by HNTB Corporation

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Guest Speaker
  • Kevin B. Quinn, Jr., Member, APTA Board of Directors; Administrator, Maryland Transit Administration, Baltimore, MD

Bus Rapid Transit

1:30 - 3 p.m.

Now that BRT is a well-established mode in North America, how has it changed the transit landscape in our cities? Join this session to hear best practices and lessons learned from BRT projects and services across the county. Specifically, this session will focus on issues related to scheduling and operations that are critical to consider when planning for a new BRT line. This will include the interaction of BRT service with local and other services operating along shared corridors. Successful strategies that result in increased ridership will be addressed as well as examples of how transit priority measures have best been used to ensure the speed and reliability required for BRT.

Moderator

  • Lacy Bell, Corridor Operations Director (BRT), Sound Transit, Seattle, WA
Finding the Right Mix: Evolving Approaches to Balancing BRT and Local Underlay Bus Service
  • Adam Nielsen Smith, Senior Planner, Metro Transit, Minneapolis, MN
Is this Real BRT? Is this Just Fantasy?
  • Kelly Glenn, Service Planner, Sound Transit, Seattle, WA
Piloting Bus Rapid Transit Elements on Massachusetts Avenue
  • Albert Ng, Transportation Technology Leader, Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc. (VHB), Watertown, MA

Environmental Management Systems

1:30 - 3 p.m.

The transit industry has widely implemented Environmental Management Systems (EMSs) based upon the ISO 14001 Standard. FTA has been instrumental in this adoption, through its EMS Training and Assistance Program. With over a decade of experience with 43 agencies (including 14 that have achieved ISO 14001 certification) this program has a wealth of experience in the implementation of EMS at transit agencies. While the success of EMS depends on how the agency capitalizes on the use of the program to suit their agency profile, there are underlying challenges and corresponding solutions unique to each agency’s EMS goals. This panel session will provide an opportunity to discuss these challenges, best practices and lesson learned with EMS transit practitioners from the two largest transit agencies in the United States.

Moderator

  • Steven Eget, Environmental Group Manager, Dewberry, Parsippany, NJ
Panelists
  • Antoinette Quagliata, LEED AP, Environmental Protection Specialist, Federal Transit Administration, Washington, DC
  • Thomas Abdallah, Chief Engineer, Capital Program Management, MTA New York City Transit, New York, NY
  • Dr. Emmanuel "Cris" Battad Liban, PE. ENV SP, Co-Chair, Sustainability Commitment Signatories Subcommittee; Executive Officer, Environmental Compliance and Sustainability, Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Los Angeles, CA

Planning for Transit Oriented Development

1:30 - 3 p.m.

Session sponsored by Greystone Management Solutions

Moderator

  • David D. Dixon, FAIA, Vice President, Planning and Urban Design Leader, Urban Places, Stantec, Boston, MA
Case Study: Incorporating a Battery Bus Maintenance Facility into a Mixed Use Development
  • Marc DeSchamp, Project Manager - Bus Practice Lead, Jacobs, Boston, MA
Closing the Sustainability Loop with Equitable Transit-Oriented Development
  • John Hersey, Senior Associate for Transit-Oriented Development, Regional Transportation District, Denver, CO

Recent Topics in Scheduling

3 - 5 p.m.

Scheduling is a backbone element of transit service, but it is often under-appreciated and its elements are not well understood by many within the transit industry. In this session presentations will cover recent scheduling challenges and issues tied to data and technology changes, as well as old standards of cost and staffing issues involved with use of part-time bus operators and obtaining customer feedback once new schedules have been implemented. The information should be useful to all multimodal operations and sustainability attendees who can learn lessons on some key points they may not be exposed to elsewhere.

Moderator
  • Michael Abegg, 2nd Vice Chair, Multimodal Operations Planning Subcommittee; Principal, Minuteman West Consulting Group, Benicia, CA
Part-time Bus Operators: Worth Another Look?
  • Daniel Boyle, 1st Vice Chair, Multimodal Operations Planning Subcommittee; President, Dan Boyle & Associates, Inc., San Diego, CA
"That's Easy For You To Say": Delivering on Consultant Scheduling Promises For System Reimagining
  • Imad Haj-Ismail, Manager of Scheduling, Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County, Houston, TX
Signups in Pajamas: How SF Muni Got Its Operators to Bid Online
  • Leslie Bienenfeld, Senior IT System Engineer & Transportation Planner, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, San Francisco, CA
A New Approach to Customer Feedback
  • Trey Blaise, Service & Schedule Design Specialist, Metra, Chicago, IL

Climate Action Planning

3:15 - 5 p.m.

The changing climate undermines the system’s ability to perform reliably, safely, and efficiently. Heavy precipitation, coastal flooding, heat, and changes in average precipitation and temperature threaten the performance of the entire network, with critical ramifications for safety, environmental sustainability, economic vitality and mobility, congestion, and system reliability, particularly for vulnerable populations and urban infrastructure. Hear how agencies are collaborating and partnering with cities, states, universities, and nonprofits in developing climate action plans and leading the way towards a healthier and more sustainable future.

Moderator

  • Kara Angotti, Senior Sustainability Manager, AMTRAK, Philadelphia, PA
CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAMS IN A CHALLENGING PUBLIC TRANSIT CLIMATE
  • Becky Collins, LEED AP O+M, Corporate Initiatives Manager - Sustainability, Office of Innovation, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA), Philadelphia, PA
Transit Contribution to a Resilient Region
  • Amna Parson, Transit Planner, Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority, St. Petersburg, FL
Path to Carbon Neutral: King County Metro's efforts to strengthen operational GHG emission targets
  • Carrie M. Lee, Sustainability Program Manager, King County Metro , Seattle, WA

Successful Outreach and Engagement

3:15 - 5 p.m.

Most of us think of outreach in terms of engaging the general public and elected officials, and that is important. Reviewing customer complaints can also lead to a better understanding the customer experience and influence changes to policies and practices that ensure equitable access for all, including customers with disabilities. Meaningful community engagement with disadvantaged communities can affect positive change. Having a deliberate and consistent approach to public participation on all projects provides staff with the support needed to meet high standards of practice, such as agency-wide requirements, staff resources and training and on-going relationship building. Successful inter-agency coordination, especially with other providers in your region, can improve the customer experience while also respecting each organization. Join this session to hear how agencies are working with others most successfully.

Moderator

  • Nathan Higgins, Principal, Cambridge Systematics, Inc., Medford, MA
Public Outreach & Engagement Team Strategy Program (POETS)
  • Deanna J. DeSedas, Public Outreach & Engagement Manager, San Francisco Municipal Railway, San Francisco, CA
Using the Customer Experience to Influence Policy Change and Practice
  • Jeffrey Michael Jackson, Associate Human Resources Analyst, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, San Jose, CA
  • Mehakmeet Saini, Human Resources Analyst-Office of Civil Rights, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, San Jose, CA
TriMet's Lessons Learned - Building Community Matters
  • Wendy Serrano, Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (TriMet), Portland, OR
Inter-Agency Fare Coordination and Joint Implementation -- How to be Successful
  • Mary Kathleen Morookian, Transit Service Planner, Go Triangle, Durham

Multimodal Operations Planning Subcommittee Meeting

5:30 - 6:30p.m.

The Multimodal Operations Planning Subcommittee's mission is to serve as an industry focal point for the dissemination and development of best practices, standards, and technical production of passenger transport operating schedules, plans, policies, and procedures, intended to enhance the effectiveness of route and service scheduling, planning, intermodal transfers, and training in the practice of passenger transport operating scheduling, service planning, intermodal transfers, and facility design. This meeting is open to anyone interested; subcommittee membership is limited to any APTA member. There is no need to RSVP in advance.

Sustainability Commitment Signatories Subcommittee Meeting

5:30 - 6:30p.m.

The Sustainability Commitment Signatories Subcommittee directly oversees the development of the APTA Sustainability Commitment program. This meeting is open to anyone interested; committee membership is limited to Commitment signatories.

Evening Reception

6:30 - 7:30p.m.

Reception sponsored by Jacobs

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Tuesday, July 30

Envioronmental Justice/Title VI Subcommittee Meeting

7 - 8a.m.
The Environmental Justice/Title VI Subcommittee will meet for the first time at this year's workshop. Its mission is to raise awareness of environmental justice, Title VI, and equity issues in transportation plans, programs, project development and transit services. This meeting is open to anyone interested; subcommittee membership is limited to any APTA member. There is no need to RSVP in advance.

Networking Breakfast

7 - 8a.m.

Registration

7a.m. - 5p.m.

Tabletop Displays

7a.m. - 5p.m.

Data and Technology

8 - 9:30 a.m.

With some many recent advances in technology, many transit agencies now find themselves inundated with data and looking for ways to translate this information into improved performance and service. We often struggle to present all this data to decision-makers in a compelling way but data visualizations and dimensions can help make the case. High resolution AVL data can be used to prioritize transit priority treatments and evaluate their effectiveness. Accurate data from improved technology can also enhance internal operations and help diagnose performance issues and prescribe appropriate actions. Analyzing the data allows agencies make meaningful service adjustments that improve the customer experience.

Moderator

  • Stephen Newhouse, Project Manager, Bus Speed and Reliability, South Coast British Columbia Transportation Authority (TransLink), New Westminster, BC
Planning Priority with Pings
  • Tal Green, P.E., San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (Muni), San Francisco, CA
A picture is worth a thousand words: Telling a better story with data visualizations
  • Parveen Kaur Sarana, Transportation Planner, South Coast British Columbia Transportation Authority (TransLink)
Schedule Adherence Playbook
  • Michael O. Helta, Chief Innovation Officer, Maryland Transit Administration, Baltimore, MD
Using Data (and lots of it) to Improve the Customer Experience
  • Lawrence Deeter, Planner, Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Austin, TX

Social and Economic Sustainability

8 - 9:30 a.m.

How and why are economic, social, and health assessments used in sustainability? When and how are they implemented? How can it help my organization? Applying these key processes within the over-arching sustainability framework can assist organizations in thinking, communicating, planning, and designing creatively to help leadership realize a more effective feature. Thinking through a sustainability context to identify and evaluate opportunities associated with economic and social impacts is increasingly being used to prioritize which initiatives, programs, and processes best meet the triple bottom line. Hear from these speakers as they discuss initiatives from transit agencies to create more opportunities for workforce development, social justice, health assessment, community building and engagement, and economic development within their agency and in transportation projects.

Moderator

  • Sarah Buckle, Director, Enterprise Risk and Sustainability, South Coast British Columbia Transportation Authority (TransLink), New Westminster, BC
Economic and Social Sustainability of Emerging Transportation Options
  • Pamela Yonkin, ENV SP, Principal Economist, HDR, Boston, MA
Social and Economic Sustainability Performance Measures for Public Transportation
  • Heather Unger, LEED AP, ENV SP, Corporate Sustainability Manager, Louis Berger, Morristown, NJ

Transit and Emerging Mobility

8 - 9:30 a.m.

The emergence of shared mobility services in recent years has encouraged a rethinking of how transit agencies can best meet their customers’ mobility needs. It is important to create partnerships and determine how these new players can complement traditional transit service. The presentations will include solutions to first and last mile issues, establishment of partnerships between transit agencies and other mobility providers, integration of TNCs into traditional transit service operations, developing apps for a seamless customer experience and initializing a plan for a mobility strategy of tomorrow. The topics covered in this session should be of equal interest to attendees with a transit focus and those with a sustainability focus, because these issues are at the core of future transportation planning.

Moderator
  • Regina Clewlow, Ph.D., CEO & Co-Founder, Populus, San Francisco, CA
Providing Mobility as a Service in San Joaquin Regional Transportation District
  • Donna Sonksen, Administrative Assistant, Ecolane USA, Inc., Elk Horn, IA
One Size Never Fits All - Building an Integrated Mobility Network of the Future
  • Grace Carlson, MBA, LEED GA, Service Planner, King County Metro , Seattle, WA
Using TNCs to Complement Fixed Route Service
  • Nicole Dufva, Public Engagement Planner, Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority, St. Petersburg, FL
Stuck in the Middle with You – Addressing Denver’s First and Last Mile Problem
  • Paul DesRocher, Manager, Planning Coordination, Regional Transportation District, Denver, CO

A Multimodal Potpourri

9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

Come learn a little about a lot. This potpourri features sessions thatdidn’t fit neatly into one of the designated topic areas but are too good topass up!

Moderator
  • John FitzGibbon, Director-Planning & Scheduling, City of Edmonton, Edmonton, AB
A comparison of contracting approaches in the Twin Cities region
  • John Harper, Manager, Contracted Transit Service, Metropolitan Council, St. Paul, MN
Inreach – Tapping into Bus Operator feedback and closing the feedback loop
  • Teddy Krolik, Chief of Engagement, Maryland Transit Administration, Baltimore, MD
Designing a Transit Network for the People
  • Scott Hamwey, Manager of Long-Range Planning, Massachusetts Department of Transportation, Boston, MA

Integrating Health and Wellness for Livable Communities

9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

Creating safe, accessible streets and improving access to healthcare services and providers and healthful amenities go far in building and promoting healthy, livable communities. Frameworks such as the CDC’s Social determinants of Health and the HUD Promise Zone priorities invite the participation of transit and mobility professionals to develop integrated livable communities. What are the politics, processes and mechanics of integrating health, active transportation, and equity issues into the planning and design of livable communities especially capitalizing on diverse Federal initiatives? What is the link between how we build our cities and transportation networks, and the physical, social, mental and economic wellness of our communities? Hear your peers' techniques and perspectives in tapping into diverse Federal programs, integrating health impact in decision-making and active transportation in service planning, community design, and planning for healthy corridors.Moderator
  • Richard A. Weaver, Chair, National Complete Streets Coalition; and Director–Planning, Policy & Sustainability, American Public Transportation Association, Washington, DC
Transit's Multipronged Approach to Improving Health & Wellness
  • Jacob Labutka, Transit Planner, Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority, St. Petersburg, FL
Integrating Transit in Federal Health & Housing Frameworks to Create Livable Communities
  • Judy L. Shanley, Ph.D., Co-Director, National Center for Mobility Management; Assistant Vice President, Education & Youth Transition, Easterseals, Chicago, IL
Riverside Greenway - Closing Network Gaps
  • Dieckmann Jane Cogill, Transportation Planning Manager, Jacobs, Boston, MA

Sustainable Projects and Programs

9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

Transit capital projects can save energy, increase the comfort, health and safety of users, and help steward valuable environmental resources.  Join this session to hear agency experiences in incorporating energy and environment measures into the planning, design, finance, construction, and maintenance of transit facilities and infrastructure.

Walk Bridge Replacement Project: A Sustainable Project for Norwalk & the Northeast Corridor

  • Sarah N Walker, Senior Planner, HNTB Corporation, Boston, MA
Changing the Way Metro Does Business for Efficiency
  • Emma West, Operations Analyst, Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, Washington, DC
In the Balance – Trees and Transit
  • Julie Montgomery, Director of Architecture and Art, Sound Transit, Seattle, WA
  • Iman Rejaie, Architect, Practice Leader, HNTB Corporation, Bellevue, WA
Aligning Sustainability and Asset Management
  • Lauren Molesworth, Manager, Maryland Transit Administration, Baltimore, MD

Speaker Luncheon

11:30a.m. - 1p.m.
Guest Speaker
  • Gina McCarthy, Director of the Center for Climate, Health and the Global Environment (C-CHANGE), Harvard University, Boston, MA

Consistently Getting There Faster

1:30 - 3 p.m.

Transit agencies are faced with declining operating speeds in increasingly congested environments. There are many tools to improve speed and reliability. Stop spacing can be a controversial balancing act-trying to find the right relationship between service access and travel speeds is difficult. Bus stop inventory and GIS spatial data can be used to design an analytical scoring process and create a custom stop-spacing analysis model. Bus stop optimization projects can create an efficient network of stops spaced according to industry best practices and reflecting ridership and land use. Using your data to identify and prioritize the stops in need of accessibility and geometric improvements allows passengers to board and alight in a safe, accessible manner. Understanding transit operations and traffic engineering can help address the challenges that impact route performance and service quality. Creating environments where transit is the priority and applying rapid transit design principles to “regular” bus routes can help maintain & grow ridership in a challenging marketplace.

Moderator
  • Paul Bignardi, AICP, Immediate Past Chair, Multimodal Operations Planning Subcommittee; Principal Transportation Planner, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, San Francisco, CA
Increasing Ridership with Transit-Priority Streets in San Francisco
  • Steve Boland, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (Muni), San Francisco, CA
Mitigating Traffic to Improve Bus Operations: Lessons from NYC
  • Elad Mokady, Senior Transit Planner, Sam Schwartz Engineering, New York, NY
Building a Case for Data-Driven Bus Stop Accessibility and Standardization
  • Thomas Hewitt, Jr., Director, Office of Service Development, Maryland Transit Administration, Baltimore, MD
Bus Stop Spacing and Reliability
  • Khaled Shammout, Director of Transit Development, Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority(SORTA)/Metro, Cincinnati, OH

Station Area Planning for Mobility Hubs

1:30 - 3 p.m.

Many transit agencies are planning for or transitioning their transit hubs into integrated mobility hubs and tying in broader long-term goals for transit corridors, shared mobility, and mobility-as-a-service. Mobility Hubs provide a focal point in the transportation network that seamlessly integrates different modes of transportation, multi-modal supportive infrastructure, and place–making strategies to create activity centers that maximize first–mile last mile connectivity. Join this session to hear how agencies are investing in technology and shared mobility for enhanced customer experience and regional mobility outcomes.

Moderator

  • Joseph T. Iacobucci, Director of Transit, Sam Schwartz Engineering, New York, NY
All together now: invest in the service, apply the technology, build the mobility hub
  • Holly Arnold, Deputy Administrator & Chief Planning, Programming & Engineering Officer, Maryland Transit Administration, Baltimore, MD
Smart Stations: How Smart Tech is Being Used to Alleviate Customer Pain Points
  • Sasha Pejcic, Managing Principal, Transit Advisory Lead, Stantec , Dallas, TX

Sustainable Business Practices

1:30 - 3 p.m.

Incorporating sustainability into business practices involves the examination of long-term practices that establish new ways of conducting business, from the sustainable construction and maintenance of infrastructure to green procurement. Hear from these presenters on practices that achieve these goals, including best management practices for energy efficiency, waste management, and establishing targets and measuring performance.

Moderator

  • Kari Hewitt, Director of Sustainability, Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc. (VHB), Watertown, MA
Aspirational to Bona Fide Sustainable Waste Management
  • Jeffrey A. Freeman, Sr. Project Coordinator, Metro Transit, Minneapolis, MN
Role of Sustainability in Accelerating Transit Electrification
  • Christina Jaworski, Senior Environmental Planner, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, San Jose, CA
An À La Carte Approach to Incorporate Sustainable Processes and Projects at JTA
  • Alexander Traversa, Planner II/ GIS Analyst, Jacksonville Transportation Authority, Jacksonville, FL
Lighting the way to energy efficiency and improved rider experience
  • Serena Mau, Sustainability Project Manager, San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District (BART), Oakland, CA

Roundtable Idea Exchanges

3:15 - 5p.m.

Join us for an interactive roundtable conversation focused on different public transport trending topics. With over two dozen selected current topics, attendees will have the option of picking up to two topics to “sit in” for and contribute to a discussion facilitated by an industry expert. Each roundtable will begin with a short introduction to the topic from the facilitator, and then he or she will open it up for broader discussion with the whole table. Be part of the movement and what is slated to be an enthusiastic discussion over coffee with your peers!

ADRESSING SCHEDULING CHALLENGES WHEN TRANSITIONING TO E-BUSES

  • Houari Cheikhi, Business Development Director, GIRO Inc., Montreal, QC
Beyond Checking The Box: impact mitigation driven by community partnerships and Hawaiian values
  • Dr. Ryan Tam, Assistant Deputy Director of Planning, Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation, Honolulu, HI
Designing a Transit Network for the People
  • Scott Hamwey, Manager of Long-Range Planning, Massachusetts Department of Transportation, Boston, MA
Inclusive Transportation Planning
  • Teddy Krolik, Chief of Engagement, Maryland Transit Administration, Baltimore, MD
Battery Electric Buses: The Story of Phase I and Beyond
  • Jacob Labutka, Transit Planner, Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority, St. Petersburg, FL
Scaling Up a Successful Environmental Management System
  • Meghan Schulz, Environmental Safety Planner, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA), Philadelphia, PA
“Oh, The Shuttle and the Bus, They Can Be Friends: Seattle’s Employer Shared Transit Stop Program”
  • Benjamin Smith, Senior Transportation Planner, City of Seattle Department of Transportation, Seattle, WA
Making Headways: Managing the Transit Scheduling Workforce in a Time of Change
  • Michael J. Walk, Texas Transportation Institute, Austin, TX
Where the Rubber Meets the Road: Strategies and Tools for Integrating Transit into Curb Management
  • Daniela Waltersdorfer, Cambridge Systematics, Inc., Medford, MA
First/Last Mile (Km)
  • John FitzGibbon, Director-Planning & Scheduling, City of Edmonton, Edmonton, AB
Guidelines for Climate Action Planning
  • Deborah W. Matherly, Principal Planner, Louis Berger, Columbia, SC
Advancing the LEED Green Building Rating System for Transit Stations: Lessons Learned and the Route Forward
  • Lidia Berger, MEM, LEED Fellow, LEED AP BD+C, LEED AP O+M, ENV S, Director, Technical Core, U.S. Green Building Council, Washington, DC
Universal Design and New Mobility
  • Tian A. Feng, FAIA, FCSI, District Architect, San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District (BART), Oakland, CA

Sustainability Committee Meeting

5:30 - 6:30p.m.

The Sustainability Committee's mission is to support the adoption of sustainable principles (economic, environmental, and social) in the public transportation industry and to articulate public transportation’s contribution to local, regional, state, and North American sustainability and livability objectives. This meeting is open to anyone interested; committee membership is limited to any APTA member.

Off-site Networking Event

6 - 8p.m.
 

Wednesday, July 31

Networking Breakfast

7 - 8a.m.

Registration

7 - 10a.m.

Tabletop Displays

7 - 10a.m.

Life Without Diesel: Planning for Emerging Vehicle Technologies

8 - 9:30 a.m.
Analyzing Clean Fuel Alternatives to a Battery Electric Fleet
  • Kate Lyman, Senior Planner, Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (TriMet), Portland, OR
Lessons Learned from Operating Battery Electric Buses in the Real World
  • Tina H.T. Wu, AICP, Senior Technical Transit Planner, Regional Transportation Commission of Washoe County, Reno, NV
Electrifying Denver's Downtown Circulator – Lessons Learned and the Path Forward
  • Carly Macias, Senior Transportation Planner, Regional Transportation District, Denver, CO

Response to Declining Ridership

8 - 9:30 a.m.

Ridership, particularly on bus routes, continues to decline nationally. There are a lot of theories why this is happening, but what actions are being taken to reverse the trend and adapt to a new marketplace? Appropriate solutions vary from place to place depending on specific conditions and there is not a “one size fits all” answer. Does the answer include bikes and scooters, free or reduced fares, or improved stop amenities? How does a dependable methodology grounded in ridership propensity using GIS demographic data help rebuild perceptions of reliability and confidence in the network? Can agencies decide which actions have the best chance of helping us meet ridership and service quality goals? Join this session to hear about recent initiatives, both traditional and non-traditional, that your agency is trying to reverse the ridership decline.

Moderator

  • Ronald Downing, Director of Planning, Golden Gate Bridge, Highway & Transportation District, San Rafael, CA
Refining Corridor Ridership Propensity Estimates for Targeted Service Investment
  • Aaron Xaevier, Transit Planner, Valley Metro, Phoenix, AZ
Making transit appear free to the customer is the best and most effective way to increase ridership
  • Lisa Rheinheimer, Director of Planning & Marketing, Monterey-Salinas Transit, Monterey, CA
Gimme Shelter: Universal Accessibility and Passenger Shelters
  • Mary Lawrence, Manager, Ridership Analysis and Service Evaluation, Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County, Houston, TX
Analyzing Changing Ridership: Taking a Local Approach
  • Ian Thistle, Senior Policy Analyst, Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, Boston, MA

Partnerships for Sustainability

9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

Transit projects often involve a wide range of stakeholders, including government entities, transit agencies, MPOs, consultants, contractors, vendors, and suppliers, among others. How can these entities partner together to find innovative solutions to solve problems? Hear best practices for collaborating and working together to successfully advance sustainability objectives and implement multimodal projects.

Sustainable Infrastructure through Community Partnerships

  • Chelsey Hohensee, Operations Manager, Rock Island County Metropolitan Mass Transit District (MetroLink), Moline, IL

Reimagining the Transit Network

9:45 - 11:15 a.m.

Public transit agencies are updating their service networks to reflect shifting ridership patterns, changing demographics, new employment centers and other opportunities and challenges. Some agencies have started over with a clean slate, while others are making incremental adjustments at a sub-regional scale that are still significant. This session will share best practices and lessons learned from industry leaders reshaping the future of their transit systems.

Moderator

  • Gordon Robinson, PMP, Director of Planning, Corpus Christi Regional Transportation Authority, Corpus Christi, TX
Rapid Regional Growth - Embrace the Challenge
  • Linda Morris, Senior Transportation Planner, AC Transit (Alameda Contra-Costa Transit District), Oakland, CA
Cap Remap: The First Year Ridership Gains and Controversies
  • Lawrence Deeter, Planner, Capital Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Austin, TX
LA Metro NExtGen Bus Study: Innovating to Advance Network Redesign
  • Flavie Gagnon-Pontbriand, GIRO Inc., Montreal, QC
  • Stephen Tu, Senior Manager, Transportation Planning, Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Los Angeles, CA
Blank Slate: SacRT Forward Route Optimization
  • James Drake, Principal Planner, Sacramento Regional Transit District, Sacramento, CA

Closing Session

11:45a.m. - 12p.m.

Technical Tours

1 - 4p.m.

Our host, MBTA, has arranged three informative technical tours on Wednesday, July 31. Advanced sign up will be required to ensure that there is sufficient interest in the tour. Please reconfirm on site for the tour(s) of your choice at the MBTA information desk in the APTA registration area in the Westin Boston Waterfront. Tours will be limited to 20 people. Please email APTA's Elizabeth Lovinggood to register at elovinggood@apta.com.

  • Hingham Ferry Terminal – This tour will take participants on a 40-minute trip across Boston Harbor to Hingham, one of the oldest colonized communities in the US with English settlers arriving nearly 400 years ago. Hingham and its neighboring Town of Hull are served by ferry (as well as by commuter rail) to downtown Boston. At the Hingham Terminal, visitors will tour the new Hingham Intermodal Facility, which is the launch point not only for ferries to Boston but also to the Boston Harbor Islands, a 34 island National Park. The Hingham Intermodal Facility is a LEED Silver facility that includes a geothermal heat exchange system as well as a green roof. Participants will then make the 40-minute return trip back to downtown Boston.
  • The Mattapan Trolley (also called the Ashmont–Mattapan High-Speed Line) - This 2.6-mile light rail line is within the City of Boston and neighboring town of Milton and connects to the Red Line. The line exclusively uses historic circa 1937 PCC streetcars for rolling stock. Unlike most rail lines running PCC cars, the line is an integral art of the transit system rather than a heritage/streetcar tourist attraction. Given the age and difficulty in maintaining these 80+ year old vehicles, the MBTA is exploring how the line can be adapted to meet the current and future needs of the communities. In addition to riding these vintage vehicles, participants will hear from the MBTA about its plans for the corridor and how it is working with the communities and other stakeholders who are eager to see the character of the line remain unchanged.
  • Everett Sops and Wellington Car House – This tour will take people to the Everett Shops, which is the heavy maintenance facility for all MBTA bus and rail vehicles. This shop includes hundreds of skilled trades performing sheet metal work, welding, electrical work, and other activities that keep MBTA vehicles in proper working condition. In addition, the tour will stop at the Wellington Carhouse, which is the maintenance facility for the Orange Line on the heavy rail system. Wellington is being completely overhauled to accommodate the new Orange Line. Participants will see some of the new vehicles which will be going through

Note: Each tour will begin at approximately 1 PM and return to the hotel between 4:00 and 4:30 PM. All tours will involve a significant amount of walking and accessing transit vehicles. While not all MBTA vehicles and stations are fully accessible, the ones on the tours will are accessible. Where appropriate, the MBTA will provide Personal Protection Equipment (hard hats, safety vests, protective eyewear, etc.). Participants should be sure to wear footwear appropriate for a maintenance facility or construction site.